From Mexico to Nicaragua: Part 1, our last night in Mexico and some typical traveler’s problems

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Playa Linda

 

Our last night in Mexico was spent on the coast of Chiapas. We slept on the beach at a place called Playa Linda, camping out under the palapa roofs of a man named Gilberto who approached us like many of the other Mexicans we met by the beach: shirtless, grinning, hair straggly with salt, welcoming us and offering us a broad selection of mariscos (seafood). As in many other places along the coast, we bought dinner and were permitted to set up our tent for free under the shelter of the palapa, Cochita parked nearby. Gilberto and his family had their house a bit further back from the shore, the rear guard for their collection of palapas advancing along the sand. Telenovelas were playing on a tiny television near the open kitchen where they cooked our dinner, with a fat baby asleep in a hammock nearby, oblivious to the overwrought young couple making out onscreen. The hotels and seaside restaurants of Chiapas all seemed to have a feature unseen in Oaxaca: large, low, freshwater swimming pools made of cement, the sides coming up a few feet above ground. Gilberto tended to his lovingly, pacing through the water at sunset, sweeping for debris, rejuvenating the chlorine. We never saw anyone swim in it.

That night, I ate a delicious plate of ceviche, drank mezcal on the beach, and then fell asleep in the tent with Jane for about an hour and a half, at which point I was woken by terrible pain in my stomach and spent the next four or so hours writhing and groaning miserably on the dirt outside of the toilets, enduring waves of piercing cramps that left me drenched in sweat and collapsed on the ground, or the cement stairs, or the broken-down plastic chairs, or the toilet with its tank boiling with frantic hormigas (ants); whatever godforsaken position I was when the pain struck me.

Fortunately (or unfortunately?) I had experienced this type of stomach problem previously in my travels, and rode it out, stoic in the knowledge that I just had to puke my guts up a little more and the offending particles would work their way through. Near the end, Jane sat with me and, to distract me, retold the sections of Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal that we had listened to that morning in the car. “So, he went to live with the Douglases,” she said, and I rose up in my sweaty delirium to protest, weakly, no, no, Dursleys.

Shortly thereafter I fell asleep and woke up, dazed, having forgotten entirely about Harry Potter. She was recounting a bit muggles seeing wizards in the workplace and I wondered vaguely what she was talking about – wizards? – and drifted off again thinking how strange it was, that I was lying on a yellow waffle camping mat on the packed sand of a seafood restaurant in Chiapas, with my college roommate by my side, the woman who was one of my first and best friends in that singular experience, while my very first car watched over us from the side, resting with my entire life crammed into her small trunk. Harry Potter y la Piedra Filosofal. Perilous Mexican ceviche. Journeys undreamt of in 2003, when I probably still had environmentalist aspirations of never owning a car. Soon after, I dragged myself back to the tent and slept till morning, when we woke and drove the scant few kilometers to the Guatemalan border.

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